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Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Camden Newark New Brunswick/Piscataway
Catalogs
  Graduate School-New Brunswick 2017 Programs, Faculty, and Courses Quantitative Biomedicine 848 Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree  
Graduate School-New Brunswick

Any substitutions of required courses require prior approval by the graduate program director or associate graduate program director. A grade of B or better is necessary.

YEAR 1

Semester 1: One course from each Track (A,B,C)

TRACK A: Physics and Chemistry of Living Matter

Biophysical Chemistry I 16:160:537 (3)

TRACK B: Data, Computation, and Statistics

1. A computer science master's-level course or the equivalent (by arrangement with the graduate program director or associate director in quantitative biomedicine)

2. One of the following statistics courses (by arrangement with the graduate program director in statistics and biostatistics):

Intermediate Statistical Analysis 01:960:384 (3)

Basic Applied Statistics 01:960:484 (3)

Regression Analysis 16:960:563 (3)

Survey Sampling 16:960:576 (3)

Interpretation of Data I 16:960:586 (3)

Interpretation of Data II 16:960:587 (3)

Data Mining 16:960:588 (3)

Design of Experiments 16:960:590 (3)

Statistic Theory for Research Workers 16:960:501 (3) (Prereq: undergraduate precalculus)

Bayesian Analysis 16:215:571 (3)

3. A bioinformatics course:

Undergraduate

Genetics:

Genome Evolution 01:447:352 (3)

Evolutionary Genetics 01:447:486 (3)

Biotech and Plant Biology:

Bioinformatics 11:126:485 (3) (Biotech) and 16:765:585:01 (Plant Biology) (3)

Graduate

Business and Science:

Clinical Research in Informatics 16:137:580 (3)

Bioinformatics: Tools for Genomic Analysis 16:137:617 (3)

TRACK C: Quantitative Modeling in Biology

Dynamical Models in Biology 16:848:504 (3)

Conversational Mathematical Modeling 11:216:458 (3)

An applied math modeling course (by arrangement with the graduate program director or associate director in quantitative biomedicine)

Semester 2 : Two courses from Track A or B or C and one course from another Track

TRACK A: Physics and Chemistry of Living Matter

Physics of Living Matter 16:1848:617:01 (3)

Biophysical Chemistry II 16:160:538 (3)

TRACK B: Data, Computation, and Statistics

1. A computer science master's-level course or the equivalent (by arrangement with the graduate program director or associate director in quantitative biomedicine)

2. One of the following statistics courses (by arrangement with the graduate program director in statistics and biostatistics):

Intermediate Statistical Analysis 01:960:384 (3)

Basic Applied Statistics 01:960:484 (3)

Regression Analysis 16:960:563 (3)

Survey Sampling 16:960:576(3)

Interpretation of Data I 16:960:586 (3)

Interpretation of Data II 16:960:587(3)

Data Mining 16:960:588(3)

Design of Experiments 16:960:590 (3)

Statistic Theory for Research Workers 16:960:501 (3) (Prereq: undergraduate precalculus)

3. A bioinformatics course:

Undergraduate:

Genetics:

Quantitative Biology and Bioinformatics 01:447:302 (3)

Genome Evolution 01:447:352 (3)

Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources:

Conversational Mathematical Modeling 11:216:458 (3)

Fundamentals of Genomics 11:216:465 (3)

Graduate:

Biomedical Engineering:

Computer Integrated Interventions in Medicine 16:125:623 (3)

Business and Science:

Bioinformatics: Tools for Genomic Analysis 16:137:617 (3)

Chemistry and Chemical Biology:

Data Science and Structural Biology 16:160:579:02 (2)

TRACK C: Quantitative Modeling in Biology

Dynamical Models in Biology 16:848:504 (3) (Note: not always offered)

Mathematics of Cancer 01:640:459 (3) (Note: not always offered)

Biomedical Mathematical Methods 16:125:501 (3)

An applied math modeling course (by arrangement with the graduate program director or associate director in quantitative biomedicine)

YEAR 2

Seminar in Quantitative Biomedicine (2 X 1 cr): 16:118:616:01 Fall and Spring

Specialized electives course(s) (1 credit in a relevant area of study) This may consist of regular courses, minicourses, or other approved offerings.

Examples of minicourses in molecular biosciences (16:695:622-635):

The Cillium, Organelle of the 21st Century

Cancer and Clinical Oncology

Cancer Genes and Cells

Evolution of Emerging Viruses

Noncoding Regulatory RNA

Toll-Like Receptors in Health and Disease

Molecular Biology of Cancer

P53

Understanding the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System and Its Involvement in Disease

Neural Circuit Microscopy

Pluripotent and Somatic Stem Cells

Regenerative Medicine - Stem Cell Therapy

Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Genetic Systems and Structures

Genetics and Cell Biology of Fertilization

Examples of regular courses of possible interest:

Fundamentals of Molecular Biosciences 16:695:538 (6)

Experimental Methods in Molecular Biosciences 16:695:539 (2)

Molecular Biology of Cells 16:148:514 (3)

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry 16:115:511/512 and 16:694:407/408 (3 each)

Biochemistry 16:115: 503 or 504 (4)

Molecular Basis of Physiology 16:761:580 (3)

Genetic Systems and Structures 16:848:617:02 (3)

Human Genetics 16:681:535 (3)

Cancer 01:447:495 (3)

Cell and Molecular Pharmacology: Principles of Drug Action and Targeting 16:718:680 (3)

Drug Delivery: Fundamentals and Applications 16:125:590 (3)

Introduction to Applied Mathematics 01:640:321 (3)

Biocontrol, Modeling, and Computation 16:125:572 (3)

Thermal Physics 01:750:351 (3)

Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 01:750:361 (3)

Advanced Topics in Statistical Mechanics and Biological Physics 16:750:677 (3)

Physical Chemistry: Biochemical Systems 01:160:341 or 342 (3)

Concepts in Nanochemistry 16:160:579:01 (3)

Computational Chemistry 16:160:579:04 (3)

Chemical Thermodynamics 16:160:525 (3)

Thermodynamics and Kinetics 16:160:541:01 (3)

Structural Biology, Structural Biophysics, and Chemical Biology of Transcription/Structural Biology/Biophysics 16:160:580 (3)

Communicating Science 16:718:560 (0)

Graduate Writing 16:355:502 (0)

Winter Session of any Year(s) in Graduate School

Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology Boot Camp 16:848:601 (1)

Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology Boot Camp 16:848:615 (2)

Ethical Conduct in Scientific Research

Available in most science- or engineering-oriented graduate programs and online as well.

Responsible and Ethical Research I 16:486:501 (0)

Introduction to Research 16:160:603 (1)

Ethical Scientific Conduct 16:115:556 (1)

Research Rotations

In the first year, students typically engage in one-three rotations (16:848:621 and 622; 1 credit per rotation). Rotations provide the opportunity to explore research (for two months per rotation) in the quest of finding a research group in which to do one's dissertation research. The format for lab rotations varies depending upon the research group. Students may be given an independent laboratory research project and/or may assist other members of the lab in data acquisition and analysis. During this time, the student attends and participates in laboratory group meetings and related events. Students are responsible for arranging their own laboratory rotations by contacting faculty with whom they are interested in having rotations. Students should talk with faculty about their interest at the beginning of the first year (or, better yet, before arriving), as labs fill up quickly.

Teaching Requirement

Assistant teaching (normally in the form of TAs; 6 credits/semester) is formally required for the equivalent of one semester. A possible alternative to doing a TA could be assisting with the teaching of a course (by arrangement with the professor). This might consist of such activities as preparing and performing demonstrations, preparing and grading quizzes, and/or preparing and providing a lecture. This kind of alternative teaching can be arranged upon agreement with the graduate program director and the professor teaching the course (and can be indicated on the student transcript as "Teaching Apprenticeship").

Examination and Thesis Requirements

A. Written Qualifying Exam (End of Year 1)

Students will have a written qualifying exam at the end of their first year of graduate school during which they will demonstrate their working knowledge of the course material learned in the first year of graduate school. The questions will be provided and graded by the course instructors. Students will either pass the exam, be given a chance to retake the exam (or course) and retested, or will be terminated from the program, depending on their performance.

B. Admission of Candidacy Exam (By End of Year 2)

Students will have a written and oral admission-of-candidacy exam with the Admission of Candidacy Exam Committee, focused on the student's proposed thesis research.

1) Written component:

Students prepare a written proposal for their thesis research that must be not exceed 20 pages single-spaced (not including references). The preparation of the proposal is intended to educate the student (i.e., about the work that has been done in the field to date and the techniques that will be useful for the work [e.g., the how to and the principles]) and to promote creative thinking about the outstanding problems in the field and ways to solve these problems. The student should obtain the application for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree from the office of the graduate school and submit it to the chair of the committee at the time of the examination.

2) Oral component:

The student will defend the proposal and show relevant knowledge in an oral presentation of approximately 30 minutes in duration. The date for this component of the qualifying exam should be set up with the committee members at least two weeks before the scheduled date of the exam. The Exam Committee will meet after the exam and decide among the following three options: (1) Pass; (2) Fail; (3) Fail with an opportunity to repeat the exam. In the case of option #3, the student must repeat the exam within three months after the first exam. Repeat exams will be graded as Pass or Fail only. If the student passes Exam B, the members of the candidate's committee and the graduate director will sign the application for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree (see Forms). This form must be returned to the office of the associate director of graduate studies. If the student does not pass the qualifying exam, she or he may be eligible to earn a master's degree at this stage. (See section on quantitative biomedicine master's program.)

Students are expected to submit and defend a dissertation within five years of starting the program.

 
For additional information, contact RU-info at 732-932-info (4636) or colonelhenry.rutgers.edu.
Comments and corrections to: Campus Information Services.

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