Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Camden Undergraduate
 
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Undergraduate Education in Camden
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Liberal Arts Colleges
Camden College of Arts and Sciences
University College-Camden
Programs, Faculty, and Courses
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Availability of Majors
Accounting 010
Africana Studies 014
American History 512
American Literature 352
Anthropology 070
Art 080
Art History 082
Arts and Sciences 090 (Interdisciplinary Courses)
Astronomy 100
Biochemistry 115
Biology 120
Biology, Computational and Integrative 121
Business Administration 135
Business Law 140
Chemistry (Biochemistry 115, Chemistry 160)
Childhood Studies 163
Computer Science 198
Criminal Justice 202
Dance 203
Digital Studies 209
Economics 220
Engineering Transfer 005
English and Communication (Communication 192, English Literature 350, American Literature 352, Film 354, Journalism 570, Linguistics 615, Rhetoric 842, Writing 989)
Major Requirements: CCAS and UCC
Minor Requirements: CCAS and UCC
Independent Study and Internship: CCAS and UCC
Departmental Honors Program: CCAS and UCC
Teacher Certification in English: CCAS and UCC
Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit: CCAS and UCC
Dual-Degree Program
Courses (Communication 192)
Courses (English Literature 350)
Courses (American Literature 352)
Courses (Film 354)
Courses (Journalism 570)
Courses (Linguistics 615)
Courses (Rhetoric 842)
Courses (Writing 989)
Finance 390
Forensic Science 412
French 420
Gender Studies 443
Geology 460
German 470
Global Studies 480
Health Sciences 499
History (Historical Methods and Research 509; European History 510; American History 512; African, Asian, Latin American, and Comparative History 516)
Honors College 525
Human Resource Management 533
Individualized Majors and Minors 555
Journalism 570
Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS) Minor
Law
Learning Abroad
Liberal Studies 606
Linguistics 615
Management 620
Management Science and Information Systems 623
Marketing 630
Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics 640, Statistics 960)
Medicine, Dentistry, and Veterinary Medicine
Museum Studies 698
Music 700, 701
Pharmacy 720
Philosophy and Religion 730, 840
Physics 750
Political Science 790
Psychology 830
Religion 840
Reserve Officer Training Programs
Social Work 910
Sociology (920), Anthropology (070), and Criminal Justice (202)
Spanish 940
Statistics 960
Teacher Education 964
Theater Arts (Dance 203, Theater Arts 965)
World Languages and Cultures (French 420, German 470, Global Studies 480, Spanish 940)
Urban Studies 975
Visual, Media, and Performing Arts (Art 080; Art History 082; Museum Studies 698; Music 700, 701; Theater Arts 965)
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Camden Newark New Brunswick/Piscataway
Catalogs
  Camden Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2023 Liberal Arts Colleges Programs, Faculty, and Courses English and Communication (Communication 192, English Literature 350, American Literature 352, Film 354, Journalism 570, Linguistics 615, Rhetoric 842, Writing 989) Courses (Film 354)  

Courses (Film 354)

50:354:191 Laboratory in Diversity in United States (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education U.S. in the world (USW) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:192 Laboratory in Engaged Civic Learning (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education engaged civic learning (ECL) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:193 Laboratory in Writing-Intensive Practice (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education writing (WRI) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:194 Laboratory in Experiential Learning (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education experiential learning (XPL) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:195 Laboratory in Diversity (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education diversity (DIV) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:196 Laboratory in Engaged Civic Learning (0,1) The Engaged Civic Learning Lab is a 0- or 1-credit addition to a course or a section of a course that indicates that specific course or course section will satisfy the learning goals for the cross-cutting category of Engaged Civic Learning. This means that students taking this course or section should expect to engage in discussions, learning activities, and critical reflections that involve a community-focused, participatory component.
50:354:197 Laboratory in Experiential Learning (0,1) The Experiential Learning Lab is a 0- or 1-credit addition to a course or a section of a course that indicates that specific course or course section will satisfy the learning goals for the cross-cutting category of Experiential Learning. This means that students taking this course or section should expect to engage in direct experience with using the language and forms of film and its applications in practice.
50:354:198 Laboratory in Writing-Intensive Practice (0,1) The Writing Intensive Lab is a 0- or 1-credit addition to a course or a section of a course that indicates that specific course or course section will satisfy the learning goals for the cross-cutting category of Writing Intensive practice. This means that students taking this course or section should expect to engage in a significant amount of discussion about and practice with writing and that at least 30 percent of the course grade will be based on writing assignments.
50:354:201 The Art of Film (3) Covers the skills necessary for the critical study of film, including an overview of the different aspects of film form--story, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound--and how the principles allow us to analyze and study film as an art form.
50:354:210 Literature and Film: Issues of Adaptation (3) An introductory discussion of film adaptations of literary works that examines how cinematic techniques change works. Discussion of the adaptation process: what is lost, and what gained, by the transformation? Considers various works of art, both historical and contemporary.
50:354:211,212 Special Topics in Film (3,3) Introductoryá courses which use films, along with selected readings, to highlight issues in culture such as race, ethnicity, and historical contexts. Examples: From Jacobs to Django: American Slavery, The Middle Ages in the Movies, and Shakespeare on Film.
50:354:213 Blockbusters and Disability (3) Explores the principles and imperatives of disability studies by way of an investigation of Hollywood blockbuster films. It simultaneously understands disability as a social construction even while recognizing people with disabilities as a political minority that deserve similar consideration as interconnected and overlapping groups, such as people of color, women, and members of various LGBTQ communities.
50:354:214 Images of the City in Literature and Film (3) In this course we will use a variety of text--film, books, audio--to examine the city as a setting and subject. In particular, we will discuss urban life both within and across racial lines. How are figures from African-American, Latina-American, and Asian-American communities portrayed in literature and film? What, if any, is their interaction with one another? Authors whose work we are likely to read include James Baldwin, Sandra Cisneros, Jamaal May, and Lauryn Hill. Filmmakers likely to include Thomas A. Edison, Ridley Scott, Spike Lee, Dave Chappelle, and Grace Lee.
50:354:215 Romantic Comedy (3) An examination of the romantic comedy from the 1930's through the present, with an emphasis on shifting cultural assumptions about couplehood, marriage, and sexuality.
50:354:216 International Film of the 1960s and 1970s (3) The 1960s and 1970s were a time of upheaval in politics, and American cinema was hugely influential globally. American films also responded to innovations from European and other filmmakers. This course will track the process of cross-fertilization over a particularly important period.
50:354:217 Introduction to Documentary Film (3) This course is an introduction to the history and theory of documentary film. Through readings and screenings, students will review and analyze the evolution of the documentary film genre and its modes. The course will also explore concepts that are central in documentary filmmaking, including ethical, legal, and artistic issues that are critical in nonfiction filmmaking.
50:354:218 Shakespeare and Film (3) This course aims to give you an introduction both to some of Shakespeare's leading plays, studied in their original context, and to some of the most remarkable and brilliant film versions of these dramas in modern times, which are works of art in their own right, and radiate fresh dimensions of meaning.
50:354:295 Laboratory II in Diversity (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education diversity (DIV) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:296 Laboratory II in Engaged Civic Learning (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education engaged civic learning (ECL) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:297 Laboratory II in Experiential Learning (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education experiential learning (XPL) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:298 Laboratory II in Writing (0-1) Corequisite associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education writing (WRI) requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted.
50:354:300 History of Film I (3) The development of major film movements, with particular attention to the technical and stylistic contributions of major directors.
50:354:301 History of Film II (3) 1945 through the rise of conglomeration in the 1980s, including film noir, Neorealism, Japan's Golden Age, the New Wave, the arrival of TV, the end of the Hollywood studio system, the rise of personal cinema, and the blockbuster. Second part of required course in support of the English department's new track in film and media studies.
50:354:302 History of Film III (3) Contemporary cinema, covering the globalization of film, the influence of Hong Kong and South Korea, the rise of Third World cinema, as well as the arrival of visual effects and the proliferation of animation, independent cinema, and the end of film and the transition to digital cinema.
50:354:310 Literature and Film (3) Adaptations from other narrative and dramatic forms; relations between literary and film conventions; special problems in adapting literary works to film.
50:354:311 Film Theory (3) Introduction to critical methods for discussing film and film history, which will examine methods for discussing film biography, production, and other historical issues. Students will get an overview of influential critical approaches, including structuralism, psychoanalysis, and narratology.
50:354:312 Women in Film (3) Examines women as subjects and objects in films, as well as highlighting influential female filmmakers. Feminist film theory will be used to examine both Hollywood and independent films. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing films for constructions of gender, but issues of sexual orientation, race, and class will also be discussed.
50:354:313 Hitchcock (3) An overview of the career of Alfred Hitchcock, which will showcase his most important films and also discuss his influence on contemporary filmmaking.
50:354:314 Special Topics in Animation (3) This course covers a range of topics in animation history, production, reception, style, aesthetics, and expression. Courses may include a broad survey of innovative animators from around the world; specialty courses such as children's animation, female animators, puppets and claymation, or anime; or signature studios such as Disney or Ghibli.
50:354:315 American Film (3) The American film from the silent period to the present; concentrated study of several major directors such as Ford, Hawks, and Welles.
50:354:316 The Journalist in and on Film (3)
For many, our understanding of what journalists do has been shaped by popular culture, more specifically, by how reporters, editors, and media moguls are portrayed in film. From the hapless bumbler to the crusader, the hard-bitten cynic to the power-hungry megalomaniac, the ambitious scoundrel to the intrepid investigator, cinema's depictions of journalists, real or fictional, have both reinforced stereotypes and provided keen insights. This course will offer a comprehensive look at how the news, and those who produce the news, are portrayed in movies and how that impacts our perceptions of the media. We will view and discuss films focused on journalists from over the last 80 years, including His Girl Friday, Citizen Kane, Superman, All the President's Men, Good Night and Good Luck, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Shattered Glass, Anchorman, Truth, and 2016's Best Picture Oscar winner, Spotlight. Graded assignments will include a film viewing journal blog, a movie critique, and a researched, analytical magazine style article.
50:354:317 Rich and Poor in Western Cinema (3) This course will screen a dozen films, European and American, representing rich and poor lifestyles, from the Middle Ages on.á We will also read ethical works on economic progress and polarization, from Adam Smith and Karl Marx through William F. Buckley, Roger Scruton, and Gustavo Gutierrez.
50:354:320 World Cinema (3) Major developments and achievements in French, Italian, British, Russian, and other national cinemas; cross-influences between foreign and American cinema.
50:354:350 Major Filmmakers (G) (3) The viewing, analysis, and discussion of selected films by such directors as Griffith, Eisenstein, Ford, Huston, Welles, Bergman, Fellini, Bu˝uel, and Kurosawa.
50:354:389 Independent Study in Film (3) An opportunity for advanced students to work individually with an instructor on a self-determined course of study.
50:354:391,392,393,394 Special Topics in Film (3,3,3,3) A course in a specially selected topic. Primarily, but not exclusively, for advanced students. Courses with different topics may be repeated for credit.
50:354:395 Screenwriting (3) Instruction and practice in preparing screenplays for production.
50:354:396,397,398,399 Studies in Film Genres (3,3,3,3) Intensive study of a particular genre of film, including the musical, the western, the crime drama, the comedy, or science fiction film.
50:354:401 Advanced Screenwriting (3) An advanced course in screenwriting for students who have already mastered the basics of screenplay structure and writing. Prerequisite: 50:354:395 or permission of instructor.
50:354:410 Senior Seminar in Film Study (3) Allows students to do intensive research and critical writing on a major figure, movement, or issue in film studies.
 
For additional information, contact RU-info at 848-445-info (4636) or colonelhenry.rutgers.edu.
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