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New Brunswick/Piscataway Undergraduate Catalog 2005-2007 School of Engineering Descriptions of Fields of Study Electrical and Computer Engineering  

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electrical and computer engineering is a rapidly developing and diverse field ranging from integrated circuits and submicron devices to powerful computational systems and massive communication networks, such as those used in the information superhighway. Over the past two decades, increasing numbers of electrical and computer engineering graduates have been engaged in the development and application of solid-state electronic devices, electronic computers and data processing systems, and automatic control systems of increasing sophistication. In turn, these developments have led to further development of the more traditional technologies, such as energy conversion and transmission; electrical circuit synthesis; and particularly to an unprecedented growth of electronic data processing, communication, control, and computer systems.

To prepare its graduates to compete in a fast-changing technical environment, the department depends upon a curriculum with a strong core of required courses in mathematics, physical sciences, and engineering science. In addition, students have considerable freedom to choose electives in these and other areas of study. As a result, electrical and computer engineering undergraduates may structure their programs to accommodate the changes of the electrical and electronic industry and to prepare for graduate study in such diverse areas as control and power systems, communication systems, digital signal processing, computer engineering, solid-state electronics, wireless information networks, and others. The wide range of subject matter enhances the student's opportunity for challenging employment and graduate study.

The department offers two curriculum options for undergraduate students: electrical engineering and computer engineering. The electrical engineering option follows a traditional set of required courses with equal emphasis on all main areas of electrical engineering, yet allows a student to favor one area over another by appropriate selection of elective courses. The computer engineering option, while giving a broad background in electrical engineering, preparesstudents for careers in the area of computer hardware and software engineering.

Program Objectives

Consistent with the stated mission of the university, the mission of the electrical and computer engineering program is to prepare its graduates for a rapidly changing technological field. Students are provided with a broad and thorough education in electrical and computer engineering fundamentals, applications, and design so as to prepare them for a career in the electrical and computer engineering profession, and for continuing their studies at the graduate level. In pursuit of this mission, the educational objectives are

1.to provide a broadly based educational experience in which the scientific and technical elements of the engineering curriculum are integrated with the humanities and social sciences;

2.to ensure that students are competent in fundamental areas in electrical and computer engineering, such as communications, computer engineering (hardware and software), digital signal processing, systems and controls, solid state electronics, and circuits;

3.to ensure that students are able to identify, formulate, and solve a wide range of electrical and computer engineering problems using modern engineering tools and techniques;

4.to provide students with a major design experience in at least one of the fundamental areas in electrical and computer engineering;

5.to encourage students to continue their professional development by attending graduate school, engaging in continuous learning programs, and/or participating in professional societies.

Program Outcomes

Encompassing the program outcomes set forth in the ABET Engineering Criteria 2000, each graduate of the electrical and computer engineering program is expected to have demonstrated the following by time of graduation:

1.an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering for analysis and solution of engineering problems;

2.proficiency in fundamental areas of electrical and computer engineering, such as communications, computer engineering (hardware and software), digital signal processing, systems and controls, solid state electronics, and circuits;

3.an ability to design and conduct laboratory experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data in the fundamental areas of electrical and computer engineering;

4.an ability to identify, formulate, and solve a wide range of problems encountered in electrical and computer engineering using the skills, techniques, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;

5.an ability to perform engineering design by means of design experience integrated throughout the professional component of the curricula, culminating in a major design experience involving teamwork, alternative solutions, and realistic design constraints;

6.an understanding of the importance of personal and professional integrity, ethical responsibility in the practice of electrical and computer engineering, and other professional practice issues;

7.an ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing, both individually and in multidisciplinary teams;

8.a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and professional development, including graduate school, continuing education, and participation in professional societies;

9.the broad education necessary to understand contemporary issues and the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.


 
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