Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Undergraduate-New Brunswick
 
About the University
Undergraduate Education in New Brunswick/Piscataway
Programs of Study For Liberal Arts Students
Douglass College
Livingston College
Rutgers College
University College
Cook College
History and Aims
Academic Policies and Procedures
Degree Requirements
Programs of Study
Summary
Agricultural Science 017
Animal Science 067
Atmospheric Sciences
Biochemistry 115
Biological Sciences 119
Bioresource (Bioenvironmental) Engineering 129
Biotechnology 126
Botany
Chemistry 160
Communication 192
Entomology
Ecology and Natural Resources 704
Environmental and Business Economics 373
Environmental Planning and Design 573
Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behavior 374
Environmental Sciences 375
Exercise Science and Sport Studies 377
Food Science 400
Geography 450
Geological Sciences 460
Independent Major 554
Journalism and Media Studies 567
Marine Sciences 628
Meteorology 670
Microbiology 680
Nutritional Sciences 709
Plant Science 776
Public Health 832
Minor Programs of Study
Certificate Programs
Cooperative Education
Military Education
Honors Programs
Off-Campus Programs
Office of Special Programs
Preprofessional Programs
Combined Degree Programs
Course Listing
Administration, Centers, and Faculty
Mason Gross School of the Arts
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers Business School: Undergraduate-New Brunswick
School of Communication, Information and Library Studies (SCILS)
School of Engineering
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
General Information
Camden Newark New Brunswick/Piscataway
Catalogs
New Brunswick/Piscataway Undergraduate Catalog 2005-2007 Cook College Programs of Study Environmental Planning and Design 573  

Environmental Planning and Design 573

Degree: B.S.

Coordinator: David Tulloch (dtulloch@crssa.rutgers.edu)

Adviser
Code
Office
Phone (Ext.)
William Goldfarb
(GH)
ENR 238
2-1105
Bruce Hamilton
(HB)
Blake 228-A
2-8010
Jean Marie Hartman
(HP)
Blake 226
2-8893
Colleen Hartfield
(HT)
ENR 156
2-1577
Richard G. Lathrop
(LP)
ENR 129
2-1580
George H. Nieswand
(NA)
ENR 162
2-1103
Steven Strom
(SV)
Blake 113
2-8488
David Tulloch
(TL)
Blake 220
2-9396
Jeremy Woland
(WA)
Blake 225
2-9313

This curriculum provides a broad educational experience emphasizing an understanding of planning and design as they relate to the physical environment and the management of that environment. Particular attention is given to the interaction of natural and social systems. The curriculum includes four options: Environmental Geomatics, Environmental Planning, Landscape Architecture, and Landscape Industry.

Environmental Geomatics.Environmental geomatics synthesizes a number of concepts and techniques, including remote sensing, spatial analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), and global positioning systems (GPS) that are used to improve the planning and management of natural resource systems. These techniques include the development of complex spatial databases from a wide range of data sources and the application of this information to solve environmental problems. The option is intended for students interested in pursuing professional careers in environmental planning/management, remote sensing, and geomatics, and provides a basis for graduate and professional studies. An environmental geomatics certificate program also is available for students in other programs of study. (See the Minor and Certificate Programs section at the end of this chapter.)

Environmental Planning.Environmental planning requires the integration of environmental information into the planning process and is concerned with the protection and enhancement of environmental systems while meeting demands for growth and development. This option is intended for students who are interested in pursuing professional careers in environmental planning and related areas. It also provides a basis for graduate and professional studies. An environmental planning certificate program also is available for students in other programs of study. (See the Minor and Certificate Programs section at the end of this chapter.)

Landscape Architecture.Landscape architecture is concerned with the harmonious integration of people and nature in the creation of outdoor spaces for a variety of purposes. Emphasis is on sensitive site design using both social and environmental information. Issues addressed by landscape architects range from the design of parks, housing sites, and gardens to the planning, design, and management of entire regions. This option is intended for students who are interested in employment with landscape architecture, architecture, engineering, and planning firms and government agencies concerned with parks, recreation, environmental resources, and urban planning. Landscape architecture is a professional curriculum nationally accredited by the American Society of Landscape Architects.Entrance into the upper level (junior year) is competitive, based on an evaluation of the student's performance at the beginning level (sophomore year).

Landscape Industry.This option provides students with a broad-based education in preparation for careers in landscape-related industries such as contracting, maintenance, nursery production, and garden-center operations.

I. College Mission: Interdisciplinary Critical Analysis (5-6 credits)

11:015:101 Perspectives on Agriculture and the Environment (2)

11:015:400 Junior/Senior Colloquium (3)

II. Introductory Life and Physical Sciences

A.Life Sciences (4 credits)

01:119:103 Principles of Biology (4) orequivalent

B.Physical Sciences (3 credits)

01:460:101 Introductory Geology I: Physical (3)

Students who have completed another course in the list of physical sciences courses in the Degree Requirements chapter may substitute a course in physical geography.

III. Humanities and the Arts (6 credits)

See suggested courses in the Degree Requirements chapter.

IV. Multicultural and International Studies (6 credits)

See suggested courses in the Degree Requirements chapter.

V. Human Behavior, Economic Systems, and Political Processes (9 credits)

See suggested courses in the Degree Requirements chapter. Microeconomics is recommended for students in the Landscape Industry option.

VI. Oral and Written Communication (6 credits)

See suggested courses in the Degree Requirements chapter.

VII. Experience-Based Education (0-3 credits)

Students in the landscape architecture option fulfill this requirement by way of applied problem-solving projects in upper-level courses.

Students in the environmental geomatics, environmental planning, and landscape industry options may complete the requirement without formal credit through option-related summer employment or volunteer service with an appropriate public agency, private industry, or nonprofit organization. If a student elects to meet this requirement without applying for credit, then it is the student's responsibility to provide his or her academic adviser with written documentation of work experience for approval prior to graduation. Students also may fulfill the experience-based education requirement by completing at least 3 credits from the following courses:

11:015:497,498 George H. Cook Scholars Program (BA,BA)

11:199:___ Cooperative Education

11:300:487 Student Teaching (9)

11:372:493,494 Special Problems in Environmental Resources (BA,BA)

11:704:483,484 Research Problems in Applied Ecology (BA,BA)

VIII. Proficiency in Environmental Planning and Design (57-81 credits)

A. REQUIRED COURSES (15)

Quantitative Skills (4)

01:640:115 Precalculus College Mathematics (4) orequivalent

Computer and Information Technology Competence

Computer applications are integral to all aspects of environmental planning and design.

Professional Ethics

Ethical aspects of environmental planning and design are incorporated into several upper-level courses through the use of case studies and applied problems.

Additional Requirements (11)

11:372:231 Fundamentals of Environmental Planning (3)

11:372:232 Fundamentals of Environmental Geomatics (3)

11:372:233 Fundamentals of Environmental Geomatics Laboratory (1)

11:704:351 Principles of Ecology (4) or 11:704:332 Plant Ecology (4)

B. OPTIONS (43.5-59)

1. Environmental Geomatics (42-66)

Required courses (28.5-32)

11:372:362 Intermediate Environmental Geomatics (3)

11:372:369 Analytical Methods for Environmental Geomatics (3)

11:372:371 Air-Photo Interpretation (3)

11:372:374 Global Positioning Systems (1.5) or 01:450: 355 Principles of Cartography (4) or11:372:322 Land Measurement and Mapping

11:372:442 Applied Principles of Hydrology (3)

11:372:462 Advanced Environmental Geomatics (3)

11:372:474 Advanced Remote Sensing (3)

11:375:102 Soils and Society (3) or 11:375:360 Soils and Water (4) or 11:776:404 Soil Management for Sports and Landscape Applications (3)

11:670:202 Elements of Climatology (3) or11:670: 306 Weather, Climate, and Environmental Design (3)

01:960:401 Basic Statistics for Research (3) orequivalent

An additional concentration, minor, or certificate program selected from the following (15-27):

Concentration in Landscape Architecture (18-21)

Courses selected from the landscape architecture-option requirements (see VIII B4 below).

Approved Certificate Programs (15-24)

Environmental Planning (21)

Historic Preservation (15)

International Agriculture/Environment (21-23)

Real Estate Development (24)

Social Strategies for Environmental Protection (24)

Urban Planning (24)

Approved Minor Programs (18-27)

Agroecology (21-24)

Entomology (19-26)

Environmental and Business Economics (21-23)

Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behavior (18)

Geography (18)

Marine Sciences (18)

Meteorology (18)

Natural Resource Management (20-25)

Plant Science (18-20)

Science and Agriculture Teacher Education (24-27)

Individualized 18-24 credit concentrations may be developed with the approval of the student's adviser. Students must obtain adviser approval for individualized concentrations during the first term of the junior year.

2. Environmental Planning (55-64)

Required courses (22-24)

11:372:381 Introduction to Systems Thinking and the Systems Approach (3)

11:372:442 Applied Principles of Hydrology (3)

11:375:102 Soils and Society (3) or 11:375:360 Soils and Water (4) or 11:776:404 Soil Management for Sports and Landscape Applications (3)

11:550:231 Introduction to Environmental Design I (5)

11:550:232 Introduction to Environmental Design II (5) ortwo of the following courses (6): 11:550:230 Environmental Design Analysis (3); 11:550:330 History of Landscape Architecture (3); 10:975:316 Urban Design and Site Planning (3)

11:670:202 Elements of Climatology (3) or11:670: 306 Weather, Climate, and Environmental Design (3)

Electives (33-40)

Five additional courses from the following (15):

11:372:409 New Jersey Planning Practice (3)

11:372:411 Environmental Planning and the Development Process (3)

11:375:351 Land Planning and Utilization (3)

10:975:250 Introduction to Urban Housing (3)

10:975:305 U.S. Urban Policy (3)

10:975:306 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning (3)

10:975:315 Theory and Methods of Land-Use Planning (3)

10:975:316 Urban Design and Site Planning (3)

10:975:335 Administrative Issues in Environment and Land-Use Planning (3)

10:975:420 Computers in Planning and Management (3)

10:975:444 American Land (3)

10:975:474 Tourism Planning (3)

10:975:478 History of Planning Thought (3)

10:975:481 Housing and Economic Analysis (3)

Adviser-approved course(s) in planning

An additional concentration, minor, or certificate program selected from the following (18-25):

Concentration in Landscape Architecture (18-21)

Courses selected from the landscape architecture- option requirements (see VIII B4 below), in addition to 11:550:231.

Approved Certificate Programs (18-24)

Environmental Geomatics (18)

Historic Preservation (15)

International Agriculture/Environment (21-23)

Real Estate Development (24)

Social Strategies for Environmental Protection (24)

Urban Planning (24)

Approved Minor Programs (18-25)

Agroecology (21-24)

Environmental and Business Economics (21-23)

Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behavior (18)

Geography (18)

Marine Sciences (18)

Meteorology (19)

Natural Resource Management (20-25)

Plant Science (18-20)

Individualized 18-24 credit concentrations may be developed with the approval of the student's adviser. Students must obtain adviser approval for individualized concentrations during the first term of the junior year.

3. Landscape Architecture (65-66)

11:372:322 Land Measurement and Mapping (3)

11:550:231, 232 Introduction to Environmental Design I,II (5,5)

11:550:233-234 Landscape Plants I,II (3,3)

11:550:250 Computer-Aided Design for Landscape Architects (3)

11:550:330 History of Landscape Architecture (3)

11:550:331, 332 Intermediate Landscape Architecture I,II (5,5)

11:550:337 Design Communication (3)

11:550:340 Planting Design (4)

11:550:341 Landscape Architecture Construction I: Site Engineering (4)

11:550:342 Landscape Architecture Construction II: Materials and Structures (3)

11:550:431, 432 Advanced Landscape Architecture I,II (5,5)

11:550:433 Architectural Design (3)

11:550:441 Construction Implementation and Practice (4)

11:776:202 Applied Physiology of Horticultural Crops (3)

Two of the following science courses (6-8):

11:372:442 Applied Principles of Hydrology (3)

11:375:102 Soils and Society (3)

11:375:360 Soils and Water (4)

11:704:403 Urban Forestry (3)

11:776:202 Applied Physiology of Horticultural Crops (3)

11:776:304 Turfgrass Management (4)

11:776:404 Soil Management for Sports and Landscape Applications (3)

An adviser-approved substitute

4. Landscape Industry (48-52)

Required courses (30)

11:372:322 Land Measurement and Mapping (3)

11:550:231 Introduction to Environmental Design I (5)

11:550:233-234 Landscape Plants I,II (3,3)

11:550:235 Herbaceous Plants and Landscape (3)

11:550:238 Landscape Management and Maintenance (3)

11:550:239 Planning and Planting the Residential Environment (3)

11:550:340 Planting Design (4)

11:776:211 Introduction to Horticulture (3)

Electives (18-22)

Two of the following courses (6-7):

11:370:350 Agricultural Entomology and Pest Management (3)

11:770:301 General Plant Pathology (3)

11:770:391 Diseases of Urban and Forest Trees (1.5)

11:776:200 Modern Crop Production (3)

11:776:210 Principles of Botany (4)

11:776:242 Plant Science (3)

11:776:310 Plant Propagation (3)

11:776:401 Postharvest Physiology of Horticultural Crops (3)

11:776:439 Nursery Crop Production (3)

Two of the following science courses (6-8):

11:372:442 Applied Principles of Hydrology (3)

11:375:102 Soils and Society (3)

11:375:360 Soils and Water (4)

11:704:403 Urban Forestry (3)

11:776:202 Applied Physiology of Horticultural Crops (3)

11:776:304 Turfgrass Management (4)

11:776:404 Soil Management for Sports and Landscape Applications (3)

An adviser-approved substitute science course

Two of the following courses (6):

33:010:272 Introduction to Financial Accounting I (3)

11:373:231 Agribusiness Marketing (3)

11:373:361 Land Economics (3) or11:373:241 Agribusiness Management (3)

10:975:440 Introduction to Real Estate (3)

An adviser-approved substitute business course

IX. Unspecified Electives (5-32 credits)


 
For additional information, contact RU-info at 732/932-info (4636) or colonel.henry@rutgers.edu.
Comments and corrections to: Campus Information Services.

2005 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. All rights reserved.