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New Brunswick Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2019 Programs of Study and Courses for Liberal Arts and Sciences Students Programs, Faculty, and Courses German 470 Courses in German  

Courses in German


Prerequisites

For courses numbered in the 200 series: any two courses between 01:470:131 and 136, or the permission of the department. For courses numbered in the 300 series: any two of 01:470:231, 232, 241, 242, 293, 294, or the permission of the department.

Introductory Courses

Beginners or students with fewer than two years of German in secondary school normally take courses 01:470:101-102, and then 131-132. Students who have had two or more years of German in secondary school and who wish to continue this language are assigned according to their achievement on a placement test. Courses 01:470:101-102 and 105-106 are conducted partly in German. All other courses, with the exception of literature, culture, and film courses in English translation, are conducted entirely in German.

01:470:101-102 Elementary German (4,4) Basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; study of grammar and vocabulary building; supplementary work in the language laboratory. Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of secondary school German.
01:470:103 German for Travel (1) Introduction to language and culture of German-speaking countries focusing on language competencies particularly relevant to travel. Students learn to speak in German at a basic level about themselves as travelers, learn information on the German-speaking countries and their cultures, as well as different means of transportation and accommodations one can use when traveling to and in Europe. Not open to students who have completed 01:470:102, 01:470:121, or equivalent.
01:470:104 German Conversation (1) Introduction to the language and culture of German-speaking countries focusing on the language competencies particularly relevant in everyday situations. Students learn to speak in German at a basic level about themselves, their families, studies, the weather, and leisure activities. Not open to students who have completed 01:470:102, 01:470:121, or equivalent.
01:470:105,106 German for Reading Knowledge (3,3) Development of reading skills for students who wish to acquire a basic competence in the language for research purposes. Texts chosen from the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of secondary school German. Does not satisfy prerequisite for 01:470:131 or 132.
01:470:107-108 Elementary German in Germany (3,3) Development of basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Utilization of Lake Constance region and its culture as resource material. Excursions. Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany. Credit not given for these courses and 01:470:101-102.
01:470:111-112 Accelerated Beginning German (6,6) Accelerated development of reading, writing, and oral skills; preparation for the Zertifikat Deutsch and 200-level courses within one year. Four meetings per week for 6 credits.
01:470:121 German Intensive Review (4) Intermediate reinforcement course. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German; extensive grammar review; cultural topics. Not open to students who have taken 01:470:101 or 102.
01:470:131-132 Intermediate German (3,3) Emphasis on conversation and composition, based on everyday situations, aspects of culture, and contemporary German short stories; review of major grammatical points. Prerequisite: 01:470:102 or placement test.
01:470:135,136 German Conversation and Composition (3,3) Intermediate language course emphasizing both colloquial and literary German. Utilization of the Lake Constance region and its culture as resource material. Excursions. Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany.
01:470:211,212 German Conversation and Culture (3,3) Proficiency-oriented with strong emphasis on speaking skills. Extensive use of audiovisual material and guided conversation practice; texts and discussion topics relating to everyday life, current events, and contemporary issues in the German-speaking community.
01:470:231-232 Advanced German (3,3) Reading and discussion of advanced text material based on contemporary German culture. Intensive practice in word formation, sentence structure, and expository writing.
01:470:241,242 Introduction to German Literature (3,3) Critical appreciation of German literature through the study of selections of prose fiction, drama, and poetry, and the culture of the periods in which they were written.
01:470:293,294 Independent Study in German (3,3) For students wishing to pursue an individualized project in German language, literature, or civilization under the guidance of a member of the department. Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany. Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the summer program in Germany.
01:470:299 Contemporary German Media and Society (1.5) Development of active language skills through study of the role of various media (including print, internet, film, and the other arts) in informing contemporary German politics and society. Special attention to cultural differences between Germany and the United States. Texts and presentations chosen to accommodate level of students enrolled. In German. All levels of language above German 121 welcome. Required of residents of the Wessels Hall German Language and Culture Living-Learning Community. Course open to other students and may be repeated.
01:470:301,302 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis (3,3) Introduction to the basic German terminology of literary and cultural analysis, and preparation for courses in German at the 300 level. Study of literary works and films, as well as newspaper articles, film reviews, and literary analyses. Prerequisite: 01:470:232, or simultaneous enrollment in 01:470:231 or 232. May be repeated for credit.
01:470:313 Business German I (3) Development of effective communication models with emphasis on the terminology of economics. Treatment of basic principles governing commercial organizations in German-speaking countries.
01:470:314 Business German II (3) Continuation of 01:470:313 with emphasis on the terminology of international commerce and the development of specialized language skills for diverse business situations. Contrastive treatment of cultural factors affecting German-American trade relations. Prerequisite: 01:470:313 or permission of instructor.
01:470:315 Advanced Translation Seminar I (3) Methodology and techniques of translating German-English and English-German. Texts are drawn from a variety of fields, with special attention to stylistic, syntactic, and semantic divergences between the two languages and the latest developments in computer-generated translations.
01:470:316 Advanced Translation Seminar II (3) Methodology and techniques of translating German-English and English-German. Texts are drawn from a variety of fields, with special attention to stylistic, syntactic, and semantic divergences between the two languages and the latest developments in computer-generated translations.
05:300:320 Materials and Methods in German (3) Practical solutions to classroom problems; course planning; teaching aims; pedagogical devices; language content; cultural background; selection of texts. Only for students in the German teaching program; others by permission of instructor. May count as education credit but not toward the major in German.
01:470:321 Fundamentals of Literary Analysis (3) Introduction to textual categories, literary terminology, and methodological problems through the analysis and interpretation of representative works of literature.
01:470:323 Masters of German Poetry (3) Readings from such poets as Walther von der Vogelweide, Gryphius, Klopstock, Goethe, Schiller, the romantics, Heine, George, Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Benn, and Brecht.
01:470:324 Masters of German Drama (3) Study of the drama through readings from such playwrights as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Büchner, Wedekind, Brecht, Handke, and Heiner Müller, along with analysis (using video) of current approaches to theater production.
01:470:325 The Short Narrative: 16th Century to Present (3) Studies in short genres of German prose such as the anecdote, farce, fable, novella, and short story.
01:470:326 The German Fairy Tale and Folk Tradition (3) Studies in the German fairy tale, legend, and folk song; principal characteristics and cultural contexts.
01:470:329 Heroes and Monsters (3) Survey from medieval literature to the present of the relationship between heroes and monsters, the latter considered as the incarnation of all that would destroy civilization. 
01:470:331 German Literature of the Middle Ages (3) The first "Golden Age" of German literature (1175-1225) in modern adaptation. Readings from such epics as the Nibelungenlied, Tristan, and Parzival, as well as the poetry of the minnesingers.
01:470:332 German Literature of the Renaissance, Reformation, and Baroque (3) German literature from about 1400 to 1700, with emphasis on the following writers: Hutten, Luther, Hans Sachs, Fischart, Opitz, Gryphius, and Grimmelshausen.
01:470:333 German Literature of the Enlightenment, Rococo, and Storm and Stress (3) Major authors of the 18th century, including Klopstock, Lessing, Herder, the early Goethe, and Schiller.
01:470:335 Goethe: Life and Works (3) Close reading of Goethe's works against the cultural, historical, and political background of his time. Selected poems, plays, and prose.
01:470:337 Schiller: Life and Works (3) Close reading of Schiller's works against the cultural, historical, and political background of his time. Selected poems, plays, and prose.
01:470:341 German Civilization I: Fifth through 15th Centuries (3) Cultural foundations of the German-speaking areas of central Europe from the fall of Rome to the waning of the Middle Ages. Readings from historical, didactic, and poetic documents, supplemented by slides and recorded music.
01:470:342 German Civilization II: 16th through 18th Centuries (3) Cultural foundations of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation from the age of Luther to the Napoleonic era. Readings from historical, didactic, and poetic documents, supplemented by slides and recorded music.
01:470:343 German Culture Today (3) Contemporary cultural, social, and political life in German-speaking countries with emphasis on the daily experience. Audiovisuals, guest lectures, field trips, and contact with resource persons.
01:470:345,346 German Literature and Civilization (3,3) Interpretation and analysis of major works of German literature as cultural phenomena, with special reference to the art monuments of the Lake Constance region. Field trips to key sites in Austria, France (Alsace), Germany, and Switzerland. Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany.
01:470:347 German Politics and Society: Germany 1871-1945 (3) Overview of significant political, historical, and social trends which shaped modern Germany in its early years from the Franco-Prussian War to the end of World War II.
01:470:348 German Politics and Society: Germany 1945 to the Present (3) Introduction to major political, historical, and social trends which have shaped German society, both east and west, from the end of the World War II to the present.
01:470:349 Contemporary German Cinema (3) See description under Courses in English. One section taught in German.
01:470:350 The Nazi Period in Film (3) See description under Courses in English. One section taught in German.
01:470:385,386 Junior Year in Germany (BA,BA)
01:470:387,389,391 Topics in German Literature and Civilization (3,3,3)
01:470:393,394 Independent Study in German (1-3,1-3) For students of exceptional promise wishing to pursue an individualized project in German literature, civilization, or language under the guidance of a member of the department. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate director.
01:470:395,396 German Teaching Apprenticeship (3,3) Development of various projects relevant to language teaching, e.g., preparing new teaching devices, conducting conversational groups, and tutoring. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
01:470:415,416 Advanced Translation Seminar I,II (3,3)
01:470:431 German Literature of the 19th Century: Romanticism (3) Romantic period from Wackenroder to Eichendorff (1790-1850), including Tieck, Novalis, Hoffmann, A.W. and F. Schlegel, Hölderlin, Kleist, and Brentano. Readings of theoretical and poetic texts.
01:470:435 German Literature of the 20th Century before 1945 (3) Major literary movements and figures from the turn of the century to the end of World War II, including naturalism (Hauptmann); impressionism (Schnitzler); symbolism (Rilke); expressionism (Kaiser, Trakl); neo-factualism (Zuckmayer); the outsiders (Wedekind, Hesse, Kafka); and the anti-Nazi writers in exile (Mann, Brecht).
01:470:436 German Literature of the 20th Century after 1945 (3) Literary trends and currents from the end of World War II to the present: the "literature of the ruins" (Borchert, Böll); documentary theater (Weiss, Hochhuth); Brecht's epic theater and East Germany; major novelists (Böll, Frisch, Grass, Wolf); and playwrights (Dürrenmatt, Handke).
01:470:441 German Civilization III: The 19th Century (3) Cultural foundations of Germany from the abolition of the First Reich by Napoleon in 1806 to the end of the Second Reich in 1918. Readings from historical, didactic, and poetic documents, supplemented by slides and recorded music.
01:470:444 Masters of German Satire (3) Satirical features and strategies in literary and visual texts from late medieval carnival plays to postmodern cabaret.
01:470:450 Reading Women's Lives: 20th-Century Narratives (3) Twentieth-century women's literature and film; historical retrospective and methodological introduction prepare for treatment of preeminent postwar texts. Prerequisite: A 300-level course in German or permission of instructor.
01:470:460 Voices of a Century: 20th-Century Autobiography and Culture (3) Masterpieces of 20th-century autobiography read in a social, political, and philosophical context. Prerequisite: A 300-level course in German or permission of instructor.
01:470:491,492 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3,3) Analysis and interpretation of selected works of German literature with emphasis on various literary genres; discussions, oral and written reports.
01:470:493,494 Independent Study in German (3,3) For students of exceptional promise wishing to pursue an individualized project in German literature or civilization under the guidance of a member of the department. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate director.
01:470:495,496 Senior Honors in German (3-6,3-6) Independent research on a topic selected by the senior and approved by a departmental honors committee; carried out under the guidance of a member of the department.
 
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